Released: 1998

Features: T-Rock

Gangsta Boo and T-Rock come through with the heat in “Nigga Yeah Know,” laying out a narrative of hustling with a ferocious grip on their Southern roots. This joint is draped in street knowledge and a disdain for fakes, with each rapper asserting their come-up and untouchable status in the game.

The intro sets the scene with Gangsta Boo calling out the phonies and proclaiming nothing can hold them down. She’s flexing that real recognize real and acknowledging their rise from the South — from ATL to Memphis. It’s a declaration of visibility and clout, they’re in plain sight, making moves while the haters are in the shadows, out of view.

T-Rock lays into his verse with a tale of aspiration, ambition, and loyalty. The dude’s aiming high, stacking paper for eternity in Atlanta, where the grind never sleeps. We see T-Rock’s origin story unfold; he talks about how he got his break when T-Low put him on with Mac and the Kaze. His flow then salutes his alliance with Prophet Posse, a collective including heavyweights from Three 6 Mafia, underlining his elevation to a nationwide player. T-Rock’s stance here is one of intellect and skill, leveraging his talent to burn competitors while maintaining his street cred and climbing the ranks.

Gangsta Boo Nigga Yeah Know (feat. T-Rock)

When T-Rock spits about “replacing his thang on busterous trains and camps,” he’s highlighting his strategic moves and dominance over the weak. The reference to “snatchin’ your soul” is a nod to the ultimate stake — the street’s life-or-death reality. It’s a game of heaven or hell, and he’s gunning for the top spot.

The hook, repeated with swagger, is clear: they know what’s up. “Nigga yeah know” is an affirmation of their status — they’re riding clean, getting money, and staying elevated both in spirit and with that “hella dope.” It’s a boastful anthem to their success.

Gangsta Boo comes in fierce as ever, declaring her dominance as a female force in a male-dominated arena. She’s not just any rapper; she’s “the baddest bitch,” flipping the bird to anyone trying to hold her down. She echoes the sentiment of Diddy, referencing Puffy’s refusal to be stopped, and she’s straight-up saying she’s relentless. Boo’s verse embodies the hustler’s spirit — she’s about her money and fiercely independent, taking what’s hers and never leaving a trace.

Then T-Rock drops another quick verse, highlighting the lyrical and physical ammunition they possess. He aligns himself with Gangsta Boo, forewarning any adversaries about the consequences of crossing them. When Gangsta Boo spits about “got her to a 5,” she’s likely talking about putting someone in their place, leaving them hypnotized by her power and lyrical prowess.

The track fades out on the hook, cementing their pride in how far they’ve come and the recognition they’ve gained. From ATL to the nationwide scene, T-Rock and Gangsta Boo aren’t just participating; they’re owning it, making it crystal clear — nigga yeah know.