Released: 2023

Features: Lenier

“Dueño” by 6ix9ine featuring Lenier is an edgy, flirtatious number peppered with street slangs and casual undertones, underpinned by a reggaeton beat. The narrative explores the provocative encounter between the singer and a woman he meets at a club. Though the woman is in a relationship, she is drawn towards 6ix9ine due to his charisma and assertiveness.

The hook of “Tiene dueño, dice que ese culo tiene dueño” directly translates to “She has an owner, she says that ass has an owner,” a recurring refrain that acknowledges the woman’s boyfriend but also reveals the singer’s intense attraction to her. 6ix9ine is playing with danger here, in full knowledge of her ‘ownership’ but undeterred by it.

In the verse “Dice que su novio anda por ahí / Dice que le gusto pero no está pa mí / Tú tranquila que lo’ shooter’ tán aquí / Tú tranquila que lo’ mío’ están aquí,” 6ix9ine expresses his understanding of her reluctance to leave her boyfriend. His confidence remains unshaken though, proven by his reassurance that his shooters (his loyal crew or protection) are present.

6ix9ine Dueño

Flowing into the chorus, 6ix9ine reminds us of the woman’s taken status with “tiene dueño, dice que ese culo tiene dueño.” There’s something predatory yet paradoxically respectful in his unwavering interest in her whilst acknowledging her relationship.

Diving into the second verse, 6ix9ine jumps into explicit sexual territory, describing the woman’s physical attractiveness and seductive behavior. Phrases like “Tú está’ chuqui / Te pone’ friki, japi, bien puti / Bellaca cuando le mete al tusi / Mojaíta como en el yacusi, tú sí, tú sí” exude a sense of carnal desire and lust.

A notable line in the song is “Conmigo baila reggaetón y contigo perrea,” basically suggesting that with him, she dances reggaeton, a form of dance filled with sexuality, flaunting, and a form of reclaiming empowerment for women, whereas when she’s with her boyfriend, she merely ‘perreos’ (dances like a dog) – submissive, held-back, and less empowering.

In the lyric “Ya llegó lo nasty pa que ella se baje lo’ panti’ / Tiene teta’, culo de plastic / Se rompe el elastic, porque la chica no es tan fácil,” the singer praises the woman’s physical attributes, at the same time acknowledging her resilience, as stated in the line, “porque la chica no es tan fácil” (because the girl is not that easy). This points toward the protagonist’s respect for the woman’s agency and her power to resist.

Finally, the outro “Seguimo’ dominando el mundo / Lo’ que tienen el mundo bailando / Mauro / Díselo Mauro / Díselo Mauro / Tiene el mundo bailando,” is self-referential and celebratory, proclaiming that their songs are making the world dance, causing a global wave of exhilaration. Well, hip hop, after all, has always been about creating powerful narratives, and “Dueño” does not shy away from that tradition.

In conclusion, “Dueño” is a bold reggaeton number that dances around the themes of attraction, assertiveness and power dynamics with a dash of brazen confidence. While it might appear as a simple club hit on the surface, lyrics reveal an intriguing narrative revolving around the game of seduction, pushing boundaries, while maintaining an intense respect for the woman’s autonomy and agency.