Released: 2022

Features: Travis Scott, Young Thug

Aight, let’s dive into the sonic universe of “Trance” by Metro Boomin, featuring Travis Scott and Young Thug. This track is a lavish showcase of hedonistic nightlife and the hypnotic state it induces—think exclusive parties, luxury, and that magnetic pull of the high life. For real, it’s all about that vibe you get when you’re deep in the scene, surrounded by the glitter and the glam, and just vibin’ to the max.

Kicking things off, Travis and Thugger take us on a flashback to a time in Chicago, tying it to memories of a crazy night out—no drama, just pure pleasure. They’re talkin’ about a night where they were with their crew, probably some “shorties” too, just losing themselves in the music and the moment. Metro Boomin’s beat sets the tone, lush and vibey, while these two artists reminisce on the feel-good atmosphere they created with their presence alone.

When Thug says “We pulled out the feathers for this type of weather,” he’s painting a picture of pulling out all the stops, getting flashy, because the setting calls for it, you feel me? As for the “buss up a dub,” that’s talkin’ about a woman entering the club ready to throw down some serious dance moves. But she’s not alone—she’s got a man. However, Thug’s saying he’s got a replacement lined up, that “sub” ready to take her man’s spot. Now, when he mentions “Sippin’ on wok,” that’s code for lean, that purple drank, but no tuss (which means Tussionex, a type of cough syrup). Man is being choosy with his vice.

Metro Boomin Trance (with Travis Scott & Young Thug)

Young Thug plays on the concepts of authenticity and respect in the game, sayin’ real recognize real—when you’re genuine, you command respect and power (“Like if you got the steel”). He’s boasting about taking in millions (“Takin these M’s”) and making power moves with his crew (“Then run in the field like it’s ten of us”). Thug’s flexing how he dominates the scene, cleaning house (“I’m cleanin’ shit out like an enema”), and making life a movie (“I make that shit look like a cinema”).

Now, Travis steps in, talkin’ ’bout taking the roof off, living that high-rolling life. He’s talking about loyalty (“I picked a side”), and having the girl choose him because he’s the top dog, the leader of the pack. He rides in style, even if that means scrapin’ the rims of his whip. The reference to “twenty hoes on a boat” just amplifies the extravagance of their lifestyle—they got the stamina to keep the party going non-stop.

Scott’s verses are all about asserting dominance in the city nightlife scene, questioning who else can create the chaos they do when they arrive (“Who else fuck up the city like us?”). The shoutout to Shabba, a reference to the late-night parties, where they keep the energy up ’til the break of dawn. Scott’s also flexing his wealth, with casual mentions of his bankroll, while simultaneously highlighting his appeal and charm with women (“She licking all down my chest”). Details like “Paris manners” and the struggle to avoid a woman’s ploys (“backed out of the knot, she tried to tangle up”) showcase the sophisticated yet perilous interactions in his social circle.

The hook, “I’m in a trance,” followed by “it’s givin her,” is this hypnotic state of being entranced by the lifestyle, the music, the money, and the admiration. It’s like Scott and Thugger are saying they’re not just living in the moment—they ARE the moment, and that energy is contagious, pulling them and everyone around them into a trance.

In closing out, the repetition of “I move so far in time” might signify how they feel the lifestyle is propelling them forward, almost out of sync with the rest of the world. The phrase “I’ve been” followed by various descriptions of being “whipped up in whip” and “fucked up in time” might refer to the intense and often chaotic experiences that come with fame and fortune. They’re acknowledging the work (“I’ve been working in time”) and the inner reflection (“I’ve been… inside”) that comes with this life, expressing a sort of acceptance and even relishment of the reality they exist in.

So there you have it, fam. “Trance” is not just a track; it’s a testament to the life and times of rap royalty, living life in a perpetual state of opulence, influence, and that unforgettable euphoria that only comes when you’ve made it big.