The magnetic prowess of Gangsta Boo—the hip-hop titan from Memphis—can’t be overstated. Born Lola Mitchell, she volleyed onto the scene, becoming the only female member of the iconic rap collective, Three 6 Mafia. Over the years, Boo has developed a discography as rebellious and unique as her. Albums such as “Enquiring Minds II – The Soap Opera” and “Witch” elevate raw narratives of the street while “Underground Cassette Tape Music, Vol.1 and 2” solidify her status as an undisputed queen of Southern rap.

Gangsta Boo’s artistry is also strikingly evident in her debut album “Enquiring Minds” and the audacious “Both Worlds, *69”. Boo’s records overflow with gritty narratives, gold-plated beats, and an unapologetic embrace of her femininity within a genre often dismissive of the same. These albums not only shaped her career trajectory but further ignited the flame of the Southern hip-hop scene.

So let’s get into it. From “Both Worlds, *69” to “Underground Cassette Tape Music, Vol. 2”, here we are ranking every Gangsta Boo Album, from Worst to Best.

6
Underground Cassette Tape Music, Vol. 1

Underground Cassette Tape Music, Vol. 1

Released: 2014

Label: C3Entertainment/BeatKing Made This S–t , Gangsta Boo

Features: BeatKing

This project reflected a raw, hard-hitting fusion of Memphis crunk and the H-Town chopped and screwed, a real underground treasure right here. The dynamic duo didn’t hold back on the authenticity, delivering raw and gritty bars over bass-heavy beats straight from the traphouse. Boo’s indomitable style shines throughout this record, reaffirming her status as the First Lady of Three 6 Mafia. Tracks like “Like a Pimp” and “Rambunctious” had the streets buzzing, with lyrics that hit harder than a spiked bat. And ain’t no doubt that BeatKing’s production wizardry only amplified Boo’s timeless charisma and tenacity. This joint was a crucial reminder of Boo’s influence on the Southern rap landscape, injecting some needed Memphis heat into the 2010s hip-hop scene. A real disruptor, yo!

5
Enquiring Minds II – The Soap Opera

Enquiring Minds II - The Soap Opera

Released: 2003

Label: On The Low

Gangsta Boo was coming off the Three 6 Mafia train and her second solo venture showcased a heightened sense of maturity and sophistication in her lyricism. This joint was no junior league stuff straight outta North Memphis. Nah, Boo was upping the ante, delivering reality-soaked narratives and unapologetically raw emotions over beats that carried an undercurrent of paranoia and street-bound grime. The title ain’t misleading either – tracks like “Sippin & Spinnin” and “Crash da Club” unfolded like episodes straight outta some urban soap opera, with Boo pouring her heart out while staying true to her crunk roots. Despite being an underrated gem in her discography, this album was key in substantiating Boo’s staying power, and it reinforced her position as one of the major players in the continuum of femmes in Southern hip-hop. Yo, pay respect where it’s due!

4
Underground Cassette Tape Music, Vol. 2

Underground Cassette Tape Music, Vol. 2

Released: 2018

Label: C3Entertainment/BeatKing Made This S–t , Gangsta Boo

Features: BeatKing

Gangsta Boo teamed up with the likes of DJ Paul and BeatKing to spit fire in her signature style. A mixtape brimming with the grimy, gritty essence of Southern rap, Gangsta Boo didn’t shy away from laying down some hard-hitting verses, staking her claim in the hip-hop game with an authority only she could muster. The trio combined their talents and went to work, churning out track after track of unfiltered, raw content. Listen to “Talk” and you’ll catch a glimpse of Gangsta Boo’s OG approach to flow, her words woven into the booming bass and hypnotic snares like silk threads in a dope tapestry. The album cover, reminiscent of the classic underground tapes of ol’ 90s hip-hop, was a telling nod to their roots while signifying a modern-day revival. This volume was a testament that these cats were here to trample over anyone who doubted their grit, their talent, and their authenticity. Unapologetic and relentless, this was Gangsta Boo at her finest.

3
Witch

Witch

Released: 2014

Label: Phixieous Entertainment

Features: La Chat, Fefe Dobson, Lil Wyte, Jelly Roll

Boo’s razor-sharp verses glide effortlessly over beats that are eerie, murky, and downright possessed. She claimed her throne again, teeming with the confidence of an industry veteran on tracks like “Come Off Dat” and “Gimisum.” This ain’t no Disneyland witch, folks; Boo emerges as the Southern Rap Sorceress, mixing southern grime and trap elements with her uncanny knack for storytelling. The lyrical content isn’t for the faint-hearted – there’s pain, hurt, and a sense of foreboding that lingers long after the tracks end. Boo’s portrayal of the grittiness of street life and her subsequent ascendancy is commendable. The album, laced with her undeniable passion and authenticity, is a testament to Boo’s steadfastness in a genre that often sidelines its femme players. Once again, Boo reveals that she’s no sidekick; she’s a standalone powerhouse who doesn’t break under the strain. Witch, indeed!

2
Enquiring Minds

Enquiring Minds

Released: 1998

Label: Hypnotize Minds Productions

Features: DJ Paul, Juicy J, Tear Da Club Up Thugs, Fatal, Prophet Posse, Crunchy Black, T-Rock, Project Pat

This was Boo’s first solo project after carrying the torch for Three 6 Mafia, and she was filled with a hunger to prove her worth beyond the crew. She busted out of the gates strong, dropping some icily brutal lines over spine-chilling beats by DJ Paul and Juicy J. You got cuts like “Kill, Kill, Kill, Murder, Murder, Murder” which were pure Three 6, and then you had the introspective joints like “Where Dem Dollas At” where she delved deep into her struggles, showing she was more than a one-dimensional MC. This album was a bold testament to Boo’s lyrical prowess and showed she was ready to take the throne as a boss queen in the game. “Enquiring Minds” was a raw, uncensored ride through the gritty reality of Memphis, and it announced Loud and Clear – Gangsta Boo ain’t here to play. This was straight fire!

1
Both Worlds, *69

Both Worlds, *69

Released: 2001

Label: Columbia/Legacy

Features: DJ Paul, Pheebie Gathwright, Juicy J

Released smack in the middle of ’01, this album was Gangsta Boo’s official declaration of independence from Three 6 Mafia. It was her stepping out, stilettos first, into the limelight as a solo artist. True to her style, Both Worlds was a heady mix of crunk-laden beats, crisp flows, and straight-up, in-your-face lyrics. Tracks like “High Off That Weed” showed Boo wasn’t afraid to push boundaries, expounding on taboo topics with an air of nonchalance. But don’t get it twisted: this wasn’t all about shock value, Boo channeled her experiences growing up in North Memphis into her music, bringing the stark realities of street life to the forefront. In “Hard Not To Kill,” she spit rhymes about the struggles of making it out the hood with choppy cadences that hit harder than a right hook. Clearly, with this album, Boo was on a quest to conquer, not just participate.